Blue Flag Iris redux

First post in more than a week that should reach LinkedIn. Would love to hear from anyone there who views this.

Blue Flag Iris. Got such a great response when I posted this picture to a local photo site that I thought I would share it here again.  It does grow on me more and more. Might be a good one to print and frame. Channeling my inner Georgia O’Keefe.

Noteworthy Characteristics

Iris veriscolor, commonly called northern blue flag, is a clump-forming iris that is native to marshes, swamps, wet meadows, ditches and shorelines from Manitoba to Nova Scotia south to Virginia, Ohio, Illinois and Minnesota. It is a marginal aquatic plant that forms a clump of narrow, arching-to-erect, sword-shaped, blue-green leaves (to 24” long and 1” wide). Flowering stalks rise from the clump to 30” tall in late spring, with each stalk producing 3-5 bluish-purple flowers (to 4″ wide) with bold purple veining. Falls (sepals) have a central yellow blotch surrounded by a white zone. Clumps spread slowly by tough, creeping rhizomes. Northern blue flag thrives in wetland habitats frequented by rushes and sedges (the “flag” part of the common name comes from the middle English word flagge meaning rush or reed). Rhizome is poisonous.

Genus named for the Greek goddess of the rainbow.

Specific epithet means having various colors

blue flag

Author: luzerne2112

As I get older -- and I'm 70 now -- I seem to find more and more that nature is the true source of peace, inspiration and, most of all, the truth the passeth understanding. Though my knowledge is sketchy and superficial, I wanted to share it while I can.

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